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Q.

When an aircraft is at 30000 altitude , how it maintains the pressure ?

Tags: pressure, aircraft, altitude
Asked by joyesh chakraborty, 19 Feb '08 01:57 pm
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Answers (3)

1.

the cabin is pressurized through the engine..
Answered by Anurag Sharma, 19 Feb '08 01:58 pm

 
  
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2.

Aircraft that routinely fly above 3000 m (10,000 ft) are generally equipped with an oxygen system fed through masks or canulas (typically for smaller aircraft), or are pressurized by an Environmental Control System (ECS) using air provided by compressors or bleed air. Bleed air extracted from the engines is compressively heated and extracted at approximately 200 C (392 F) and then cooled by passing it through a heat exchanger and air cycle machine (commonly referred to by aircrews and mechanics as 'the packs system').

Most modern commercial aircraft today have a dual channel electronic controller for maintaining pressurization along with a manual back-up system. These systems maintain air pressure equivalent to 2,500 m (8,000 ft) or fewer, even during flight at altitudes above 13,000 m (43,000 ft). Aircraft have a positive pressure relief valve in the event of excessive pressure in the cabin. This is to protect the aircraft structure from excessive loading. Normally the maximum pr ...more
Answered by ankit shivam, 19 Feb '08 02:54 pm

 
  
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3.

Cabin pressurization is the active pumping of air into an aircraft cabin to increase the air pressure within the cabin. It is required when an aircraft reaches high altitudes, because the natural atmospheric pressure is too low to allow people to absorb sufficient oxygen, leading to altitude sickness and ultimately hypoxia.A lack of sufficient oxygen will bring on hypoxia by reducing the alveolar oxygen tension. In some individuals, particularly those with heart or lung disease, symptoms may begin as low as 1500 m (5000 ft) above sea level, although most passengers can tolerate altitudes of 2500 m (8,000 ft) without ill effect. At this altitude, there is about 25% less oxygen than there is at sea level.Passengers may also develop fatigue or headaches as the plane flies higher. As the operational altitude increases, reactions become sluggish and unconsciousness will eventually result. Sustained flight operations above 3,000 m (10,000 ft) generally require supplemental oxygen (through a ...more
Answered by always fresh, 19 Feb '08 03:29 pm

 
  
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