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Q.

In art what is meant by the term Pre-Raphaelites ? Plz give one or two examples .

Asked by mahesh chandra, 01 Feb '09 02:26 pm
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Answers (6)

 
1.

I will give a quote from John Ruskin himself to best describe the term Pre-Raphaelites: "We begin by telling the youth of fifteen or sixteen that Nature is full of faults, and that he is to improve her; but that Raphael is perfection, and that the more he copies Raphael the better; that after much copying of Raphael, he is to try what he can do himself in a Raphaelesque, but yet original manner: that is to say, he is to try to do something very clever, all out of his own head, but yet this clever something is to be properly subjected to Raphaelesque rules, is to have a principal light occupying one seventh of its space, and a principal shadow occupying one third of the same; that no two people's heads in the picture are to be turned the same way, and that all the personages represented are to have ideal beauty of the highest order..." It was in reaction to this misdirected worship of Raphael that the Pre-Raphaelites seem to have taken their name. Their ideas were that ...more
Answered by Janis, 01 Feb '09 04:28 pm

 
  
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2.

Sorry...
Answered by Samar SinghChauhan, 01 Feb '09 02:33 pm

 
  
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3.

Pre-Raphaelites : A term introduced by Hunt and his friends, who wished to intimate that they preferred the simplicity and truthfulness of the painters who preceded Raphael. The term now signifies a very minute imitation of nature, brilliant colouring, and not much shadow
Answered by Anil K Chugh, 01 Feb '09 02:51 pm

 
  
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4.

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (also known as the Pre-Raphaelites) was a group of English painters, poets, and critics, founded in 1848 by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Michael Rossetti, James Collinson, John Everett Millais, Frederic George Stephens, Thomas Woolner and William Holman Hunt. The group's intention was to reform art by rejecting what they considered to be the mechanistic approach first adopted by the Mannerist artists who succeeded Raphael and Michelangelo. They believed that the Classical poses and elegant compositions of Raphael in particular had been a corrupting influence on the academic teaching of art. Hence the name "Pre-Raphaelite". In particular, they objected to the influence of Sir Joshua Reynolds, the founder of the English Royal Academy of Arts. They called him "Sir Sloshua", believing that his broad technique was a sloppy and formulaic form of academic Mannerism. In contrast, they wanted to return to the abundant detail, intense ...more
Answered by Jack Johnson, 01 Feb '09 02:46 pm

 
  
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5.

Pre-Raphaelites, which refers to both art and literature and the second of which grew out of the first. The examples and expressions are as follows:- 1) To have genuine ideas to express 2) To produce thoroughly good pictures and statues 3) To sympathise with what is direct and serious and heartfelt in previous art, to the exclusion of what is conventional and self-parodying and learned by rote
Answered by tapan parida, 01 Feb '09 02:45 pm

 
  
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6.

Pre-Raphaelite - a painter or writer dedicated to restoring early Renaissance ideals artist, creative person - a person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination
Answered by malishka, 01 Feb '09 02:36 pm

 
  
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