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Q.

Can u distinguish between sun and earth synchronous satellites?

Tags: education, science, environment
Asked by AMISHA AGARWAL, 01 May '12 08:17 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

Everythings orbiting something it seems. The Moon goes around the Earth, and the Earth orbits the Sun.Astronomers have calculated that it takes the Sun 226 million years to completely orbit around the center of the Milky Way. In other words, that last time that the Sun was in its current position in space around the Milky Way, dinosaurs ruled the Earth. in fact, this Sun orbit has only happened 20.4 times since the Sun itself formed 4.6 billion years ago.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 01 May '12 09:44 pm

 
  
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2.

Satellite Orbits




One possibility to distinguish between all earth observation satellite systems is to look at their orbits. Generally there are two major orbits which are called sun synchronous (or polar) and geostationary orbits.
Geostationary orbits are located about 36.000 km above the earth. At this altitude a satellite needs exactly 24 hours to orbit around the earth, the same time the earth takes to perform a complete revolution around its axis. The satellites "hover" at a right angle above the equator, therefore they seem to be stationary in the sky when seen from the earth. Hence, the satellites always "see" the same section of the earth surface and atmosphere.
Source: Read more :-http://www.seos-project.eu/modules/remotesensing/remotesensing-c02-p01.html
Answered by anantharaman, 01 May '12 08:26 pm

 
  
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3.

Nope
Answered by conviction, 01 Jun '12 10:21 pm

 
  
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4.

A polar orbit is an Orbit in which a Satellite passes above or nearly above both of the Geographical poles of the body (usually a planet such as the Earth, but possibly another body such as the Sun being orbited on each revolution. It therefore has an Inclination of (or very close to) 90 degrees to the Equator. Except in the special case of a polar Geosynchronous orbit, a satellite in a polar orbit will pass over the equator at a different Longitude on each of its orbits.
A geostationary orbit (GEO) is a circular orbit directly above the Earth's Equator From the ground, a geostationary object appears motionless in the sky and is therefore the Orbit of most interest to operators of Communication Satellites. Their orbital periods (time taken to revolve around earth) is exactly the same as the planet's (such as Earth's) rotational period. The Geosynchronous orbit is approximately 36,000 km above Earth's surface.
Answered by Farhaan, 01 May '12 08:26 pm

 
  
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