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Q.

Can radiation treatment in people impact their pets?

My grandma was doing a daily radiation treatment and is recently diagnosed with uterine cancer. I don't know many of the facts, sorry. To make it short: she was diagnosed with stage one uterine cancer, had a hysterectomy, and started radiation recently.
Her puppy, a tea cup chihuahua has stopped eating, stopped sitting with my grandmother and it is just not her typical self. Is that this as a result of the treatment?

Should the puppy be removed from my granny while she's going through the treatment?

Tags: health, cancer, radiation
Asked by Denzel Felipe, 04 Jan '13 12:11 pm
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Answers (6)

1.

The treatment for cancer is usually designed by a team of doctors or by the patient's oncologist and is based on the type of cancer and the stage of the cancer. Most treatments are designed specifically for each individual. In some people, diagnosis and treatment may occur at the same time if the cancer is entirely surgically removed when the surgeon removes the tissue for biopsy.

Although patients may obtain a unique treatment protocol for their cancer, most treatments have one or more of the following components: surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or combination treatments (a combination of two or all three treatments).

Individuals obtain variations of these treatments for cancer. Patients with cancers that cannot be cured (completely removed) by surgery usually will get combination therapy, the composition determined by the cancer type and stage.

Palliative therapy (medical care or treatment used to reduce disease symptoms but unable to cure the patient) utilizes the ...more
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 06 Feb '13 06:36 pm

 
  
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2.

I do not think that the radiation can do this to a pet still you can consult a veterinarian and put your mind to rest. It can also happen that pets generally come to know about their owners illness sadness and other emotional and physical ailments and can sense that the owner is suffering and go into depression.
Answered by Juliana, 04 Jan '13 12:15 pm

 
  
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3.

Radiation treatment given to a patient should not effect a pet. i am sure of it
Answered by iqbal seth, 04 Jan '13 12:15 pm

 
  
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4.

The dog could be reacting to the way your granny is behaving. Or canine could possibly be reacting to medicines that your granny is using. The treatment is not detectable by humans or pets.

For whatever reason, your dog knows some thing is wrong. It could be best to transfer the dog if the dog wont sit with your grandma, but if a way can be found by you to get the dog to eat a small, then keeping the dog with grandma could be a comfort to her.
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Answered by Seyal PK, 04 Jan '13 12:12 pm

 
  
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5.

Keep it away and let them be together when she gets well.
Answered by shaakal, 04 Jan '13 12:12 pm

 
  
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