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Q.

Do u know the actual meaning of "o.k."????

Asked by Sharan, 31 Jan '09 05:30 pm
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Answers (12)

1.

Nobody really knows the origins of OK - there are all sorts of theories being brandished around. One is that is widely recognised by most dictionaries is that 'OK' is an abbreviation for 'oll korrect', a humorous play on the words 'all correct'. In the early 19th Century, newspapers did not just feature serious news; they also had lots of humour and fiction. Humourists liked to deliberately misspell words. For example, they would spell words like 'no' as 'know'. It was also a fad back then to use abbreviations. So a misspelled 'oll wright' (all right) could become 'OW'. And the first known printing of the word 'OK' was in the newspaper the Boston Morning Post on 23 March, 1839, in this context: 'He of the Journal, and his train-band, would have the "contributions box", et ceteras, o.k. - all correct - and cause the corks to fly.' And thus, it is assumed that 'OK' was a play on the words 'all correct'. However, we all know what it means so does it m ...more
Answered by Janis, 31 Jan '09 06:07 pm

 
  
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2.

The words "all correct' were mis spelt by someone as "Oll korrect".
Answered by HEMANT MEHTA, 31 Jan '09 05:33 pm

 
  
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3.

Okay (often abbreviated as OK) is a colloquial English word denoting approval, assent, or acknowledgment. As an adjective it means 'adequate', 'acceptable' ("this is okay to send out"), often in contrast to 'excellent' ("the food was okay"); it also functions as an adverb in this sense. As an interjection, it can denote compliance ("Okay, I will do that"), agreement ("Okay, that's good"), a wish to defuse a situation or calm someone ("It's okay, it's not that bad"). As a noun and verb it means 'assent'. ("The boss okayed the purchase")

The origins of okay are not known with certainty, and have been the subject of much discussion and academic interest over the years. As an interjection, it has been borrowed from English into many other languages.
Answered by Naresh Swain, 31 Jan '09 05:32 pm

 
  
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4.

All correct
Answered by rabin chakraborty, 31 Jan '09 05:31 pm

 
  
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5.

Oll korrect means all correct and correct word is okay means is a colloquial English word denoting approval, assent, or acknowledgmen
Answered by SHASHI AGRAWAL, 31 Jan '09 05:35 pm

 
  
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6.

Oll Korrect German.....All correct
Answered by mahesh chandra, 31 Jan '09 05:33 pm

 
  
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7.

Allright
Answered by DARE DEVIL, 31 Jan '09 05:31 pm

 
  
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8.

No!!!
Answered by malishka, 31 Jan '09 05:31 pm

 
  
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9.

1. Orrin Kendall biscuits, which soldiers ate during the Civil War.
: : 2. Short for Aux Cayes, a Haitian port that American sailors praised for its rum.
: : 3. Old Keokuk, a Native American tribal chief who was said to have signed treaties with his initials.
: : 4. OK stands for "all correct" or the illiterate phrase "Orl Korrect."
: : 5. U.S. President Martin Van Buren's nickname "Old Kinderhook" -- OK for short. He was a native of Kinderhook, N.Y.
: : 6. Choctaw word "okeh," (or "hoke") meaning "indeed" (or "It is so.")
: : 7. Scottish "auch aye", meaning "ah yes." (Or "och aye," meaning "okay.")
: : 8. From the French maritime phrase "au quai" meaning "at dock", and therefore at last safe from the ravages of the open sea.
: : 9. '0 killed' - the report of the night's death toll during the First World War.
: : 1 ...more
Answered by Jack Johnson, 31 Jan '09 05:35 pm

 
  
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10.

Ol korrect abbreviated to ok.
Answered by ramesh ramani, 31 Jan '09 05:35 pm

 
  
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