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Q.

What is the origin of the term " the whole nine yard"

Tags: origin of the term, whole nine yard
Asked by ANURADHA PATHAKJ, 14 Apr '08 04:16 pm
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Answers (7)

 
1.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/the-whole-nine-yards.html

How was the phrase derived?

"The whole nine yards" crops up in many contexts, which isn't surprising, as there are many things that can be measured in linear, square or cubic yards - and there are also yard-arms, steelyards etc. to account for. This is the source of the variability of the many plausible, but of course mostly incorrect, explanations of the phrase's origin. Regrettably, plausibility doesn't get us very far, as the following will show. The early citations of the phrase don't in fact refer to yards of any particular material, just to a non-specific measure - 'yards'.
Answered by kishoranandvittalmangalore, 14 Apr '08 04:18 pm

 
  
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2.

Then the whole nine yard would compliment the other sails' total efficiency. More recently, the term's come to mean encouragement
Answered by roopa vathi, 14 Apr '08 04:18 pm

 
  
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3.

There seems to be some debate about where it came from as explained on the web sites below. The phrase is "The Whole Nine Yards" and basically means "Everything" or "Completely" regardless of its origins. As far as I know it has nothing to do with golf.
Answered by jameel ahmed, 14 Apr '08 05:26 pm

 
  
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4.

MEN ARE REALLY GOOD AT HISTORY...NINEYARDS OF BULLET FIRING...
Answered by nataszah, 14 Apr '08 05:13 pm

 
  
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5.

One of the most common explanations is that it dates from the Second World War, where "nine yards" was the length of an aircraft machine-gun ammunition belt, and to "go the full nine yards" was to use it up entirely.
Answered by vivek singh, 14 Apr '08 04:18 pm

 
  
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6.

Official site from Warner Brothers
Answered by Mrinalendra Banerjee, 17 Apr '08 09:57 am

 
  
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7.

Everything that is relevant; the whole thing. For example, He decided to take everything to college--his books, his stereo, his computer, his skis, the whole nine yards. The source of this expression is not known, but there are several possibilities: the amount of cloth required to make a complete suit of clothes; the fully set sails of a three-masted ship where each mast carries three yards, that is, spars, to support the sails; or the amount of cement (in cubic yards) contained in a cement mixer for a big construction job. [Colloquial]

One of the most common explanations for the phrase's origin is that the
expression dates from the Second World War, where "nine yards" was the
length of an aircraft machine-gun ammunition belt, and to "go the full
nine yards" was to use it up entirely. However, machine-gun ammunition
belts were not nine yards long, and the expression has been reliably
dated back only to early 1964, in U.S. Space Program slang. It was
...more
Answered by DRSiva, 14 Apr '08 05:20 pm

 
  
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