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Q.

What is wave particle duality of light?

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Asked by tapan sinha, 06 Sep '12 06:05 pm
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Answers (5)

1.

The exhibition of both wavelike and particlelike properties by a single entity. For example, electrons undergo diffraction and can interfere with each other as waves, but they also act as pointlike masses and electric charges. The theory of quantum mechanics is a attempt to explain these apparently contradictory properties exhibited by matter.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 06 Sep '12 06:26 pm

 
  
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2.

The theoretical wave particle duality of light states that a particle of light (a photon) exerts the characteristics of a wave and of a particle. This is a consequence of the nature of light; a single 'unit' of light comprises of a photon and an electromagnetic field, which can consequently exert either (or both) the characteristics of a wave and the characteristics of a particle. Heisenberg's principle of uncertainty is, therefore, applicable to light 'packets', and indicates that either the momentum or the position of the particle will be measured less accurately as the accuracy of the other increases.

It is considered a paradox. Einstein first proposed that Planck's 'Quanta' should also be applied to light. It was strongly resisted, but he eventually won his Nobel Prize for it. It is often misunderstood. Photon particles have only ever actually been observed at short ranges and with short life. They are however also assumed to travel from distant stars, which came back to bite Ei ...more
Answered by Psycho, 06 Sep '12 06:14 pm

 
  
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3.

The theoretical wave particle duality of light states that a particle of light (a photon) exerts the characteristics of a wave and of a particle
Answered by iqbal seth, 07 Sep '12 08:14 am

 
  
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4.

The theoretical wave particle duality of light states that a particle of light (a photon) exerts the characteristics of a wave and of a particle. This is a consequence of the nature of light; a single 'unit' of light comprises of a photon and an electromagnetic field, which can consequently exert either (or both) the characteristics of a wave and the characteristics of a particle. Heisenberg's principle of uncertainty is, therefore, applicable to light 'packets', and indicates that either the momentum or the position of the particle will be measured less accurately as the accuracy of the other increases.

It is considered a paradox. Einstein first proposed that Planck's 'Quanta' should also be applied to light. It was strongly resisted, but he eventually won his Nobel Prize for it. It is often misunderstood. Photon particles have only ever actually been observed at short ranges and with short life. They are however also assumed to travel from distant stars, which came back to bite Ei ...more
Answered by anil garg, 06 Sep '12 09:24 pm

 
  
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5.

The exhibition of both wavelike and particlelike properties by a single entity. For example, electrons undergo diffraction and can interfere with each other as waves, but they also act as pointlike masses and electric charges. The theory of quantum mechanics is a attempt to explain these apparently contradictory properties exhibited by matter.
Answered by Quest, 06 Sep '12 08:41 pm

 
  
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