Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

What is the Budhist version of the story of Rishyasringa?

Tags: religion & spirituality, rishyasringa, budhist version
Asked by spandana k, 02 Feb '13 06:32 am
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (3)

 
1.

In Nainik Jtaka , a sage lives alone in the Himlayas, there is semen in the urine he passes, and a deer who happens to eat the grass in that place gets pregnant from it. A human boy is later born to the deer and he is brought up in complete seclusion from mankind, and most importantly, from womankind.
The boy's ascetic power becomes so great that Sakka (the Buddhist Indra) in his heaven is worried by it and causes a drought to occur in the country and blames it on the boy. He then convinces the King to send his daughter to seduce him and to break his power. The King and his daughter accept Sakka's reasoning and in good faith and for the benefit of the country agree to the plot.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 02 Feb '13 06:37 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

Are you Lipsikha ? all your BA goes to her only ! its something very fishy . have never seen conferring BA to anyone ........

In Nainik Jtaka , a sage lives alone in the Himlayas, there is semen in the urine he passes, and a deer who happens to eat the grass in that place gets pregnant from it. A human boy is later born to the deer and he is brought up in complete seclusion from mankind, and most importantly, from womankind.
The boy's ascetic power becomes so great that Sakka (the Buddhist Indra) in his heaven is worried by it and causes a drought to occur in the country and blames it on the boy. He then convinces the King to send his daughter to seduce him and to break his power. The King and his daughter accept Sakka's reasoning and in good faith and for the benefit of the country agree to the plot.
Answered by joyesh chakraborty, 02 Feb '13 10:12 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (1)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

In Nainik Jtaka , a sage lives alone in the Himlayas, there is semen in the urine he passes, and a deer who happens to eat the grass in that place gets pregnant from it. A human boy is later born to the deer and he is brought up in complete seclusion from mankind, and most importantly, from womankind.
The boy's ascetic power becomes so great that Sakka (the Buddhist Indra) in his heaven is worried by it and causes a drought to occur in the country and blames it on the boy. He then convinces the King to send his daughter to seduce him and to break his power. The King and his daughter accept Sakka's reasoning and in good faith and for the benefit of the country agree to the plot.
Answered by iqbal seth, 02 Feb '13 06:54 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (1)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining

Related Answer

Q.
A

This is what tree major Abrahmic religion have ro say about the man's fall from the grace of God: The three religions agree on one basic fact: Both wo..more

Answered by ArifAnwar Khan